Ministering like Jesus

The Bible instructs us to “lift up the hands which hang down” (Hebrews 12:12) and teaches that pure religion is “to visit the fatherless and widows in their affliction” (James 1:27). The Church’s ministering program ensures everyone has a friend they can turn to.

A young woman in a wheel chair is greeted by a friend at the end of a church meeting

Ministering like Christ

Adults and youth are invited to minister to individuals in their local congregations. A ministering member is kind of like a built-in friend. Church members can turn to their ministering brothers or sisters when they need comfort, prayers, or even just a listening ear. 

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A mother hugs her daughter
A mother hugs her daughter

This Is Church: The Bruno Family

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How it works

Members are put into partnerships and assigned to reach out to specific individuals and families. Every member has the opportunity to minister to others while also receiving help and care from ministering brothers or sisters of their own.

Ministering can take many different forms. It can look like sending a text message, delivering a plate of cookies, going for a walk, or cheering at a baseball game. While these acts of service may seem simple, they can mean a lot—they’re the building blocks of a strong friendship.

Ministering allows congregations to become aware of individuals with specific needs. With the aid of congregation leaders, ministering members can support their neighbors and offer resources during times of trial. As we care for one another, we strengthen our congregations and practice being true disciples of Jesus Christ. 

Fast Offerings: Another way to minister

Throughout the Church, members are encouraged to fast on the first Sunday of every month. That means going without two meals’ worth of food and drink. It helps us become more spiritually sensitive. It also helps take care of those in need. When we fast, we donate the cost of the meals we skipped to a fund that goes to care for members of the congregation who need a little help. This is called a fast offering. 

A man hugs his son after a basketball game

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