Policies and Announcements
    Footnotes

    “Policies and Announcements,” Ensign, June 1988, 79

    Policies and Announcements

    The following items appeared in the 1988-1 Bulletin.

    Domestic Employment of Young Women (“Nannies”)

    A number of Latter-day Saint young women are being solicited to accept positions in domestic employment in response to advertisements in many cities in the United States, Canada, and several other countries. Parents, bishops, and young women are cautioned to examine carefully the contractual obligations, home environment, and opportunities for participation in Church meetings and activities in the proposed employment area. Interviews and preparatory counseling for each young woman are urged as a means of anticipating and averting potential problems.

    Young women should be very mature with good self-esteem and firmly rooted in the gospel even to consider this type of employment. Care should be taken to secure and protect the welfare of the young woman. Because of reports obtained from priesthood and other leaders in areas with a large number of nannies, and from nannies themselves, it is suggested that young women not be encouraged to accept positions as nannies.

    Commercially Produced Materials

    Many inquiries have come to the headquarters of the Church regarding the use of commercially produced instructional materials, including animated scripture videocassettes. Some rumors indicate that these materials are “Church approved.” These materials are neither approved nor disapproved by the Church. However, commercially available materials should not replace the approved curriculum items produced by the Church and available at Church distribution centers.

    Scouting

    Boy Scouts of America has recently expanded the Webelos program in Cub Scouting to be more than one year. However, Webelos dens sponsored by the Church continue to be a one-year program. Boys in LDS church units will not have difficulty earning the Arrow of Light and Webelos awards in one year, since additional requirements are minimal. Webelos dens sponsored by the Church will continue to follow the overnight camping guidelines found in the Church Scouting Handbook (PBAP0287), and, therefore, leaders should not allow Webelos boys to camp overnight with the Boy Scout troop. For the Outdoorsman activity badge, Latter-day Saint boys should not choose to do requirement number 3 unless it is a fathers’-and-sons’ campout for the Arrow of Light award.

    Primary leaders should not look to Boy Scouts of America for interpretation of Church policies regarding Scouting. Primary leaders should carefully study the Church Scouting Handbook to help them understand Church policies regarding Scouting and their own Scouting responsibilities. Using the Church Scouting Handbook, they should orient and train those in Primary Scouting positions to the policies and procedures of Scouting in the Church.

    First Presidency Decries Child Abuse

    The First Presidency has released the following statement in support of efforts to combat child abuse and strengthen families:

    “A great privilege and responsibility of mortal life is bringing children into the world and then nurturing them with love and kindness as they grow to adulthood. Tragically, there are some adults who would physically or emotionally damage these tender souls who trust them.

    “To bring the problem of child abuse to the attention of the general public, the National Committee for Prevention of Child Abuse has designated April as ‘Child Abuse Prevention Month.’ We endorse this designation and encourage Latter-day Saints throughout the Church to work in their communities to help combat this pernicious problem.

    “Much good can be accomplished when local communities work together to create a peaceful, safe environment for children. We hope Church members will continue in their efforts to find ways to support and strengthen the family.”

    The statement is signed by President Ezra Taft Benson and his Counselors in the First Presidency, President Gordon B. Hinckley and President Thomas S. Monson.