1974
If my son chooses not to go to college, what avenues are open to him for association with other LDS youth?
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“If my son chooses not to go to college, what avenues are open to him for association with other LDS youth?” Ensign, Feb. 1974, 40

My son does not want to go to college. I would like him to go to Brigham Young University or Ricks, or at least someplace where there is an institute of religion, so he can find LDS friends. If he chooses not to go to college, what avenues are open to him for association with other LDS youth?

I have often thought that the response the Prophet Joseph Smith made to the question on how he governed his followers applies equally well to our associations with our children. Remember, his statement was, “I teach them correct principles and let them govern themselves.”

Every parent hopes and prays his teachings have been adequate when the time arrives for his children to assume the responsibility of making their own personal decisions. Teaching and encouraging our children is a continuing process but should not go beyond the point where it is necessary for them to make their own personal decisions.

College is not for everyone. However, planning, preparing, and determining a course which will allow us to make a contribution to mankind must be a part of everyone’s preparation for life. It is the untrained who finds difficulty in obtaining employment.

One of the charges given to the leaders of the Melchizedek Priesthood MIA was that equal opportunities must be provided for both the student and the non-student alike. Religious training, service, and social programs are to be available to all single members of the Church through their priesthood quorums, Relief Societies, or combined activities. A structure has been established in every ward or branch of the Church that will make certain the needs of each member are served.

Perhaps not many realize that we have institutes of religion associated not only with colleges and universities, but also with trade, technical, and business schools. In addition, approximately 250 of our 436 institutes of religion offer night courses for those who work during the day.

Remember, it is not important where your children have the opportunity to associate in the programs and activities of the Church—it is only important that they do participate.

Every individual should be encouraged to avail himself of the programs and associations which will cause him to mature spiritually, in order that he may find the joy and satisfaction of a well-balanced life.