2. What If My Parent Remarries and We Are Blending Two Families Together? How Can We Get Along?
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    “2. What If My Parent Remarries and We Are Blending Two Families Together? How Can We Get Along?” New Era, Dec. 2012, 40

    2. What If My Parent Remarries and We Are Blending Two Families Together? How Can We Get Along?

    New Parents

    Love all family members. “Remember the worth of souls is great in the sight of God” (D&C 18:10).

    • I learned to focus on what both my father and stepfather could teach me and to let go of the things I had issues with. —Brian

    • Loving new parents and siblings didn’t mean I was less loyal to my other parents. My mom let us know it was good to accept my new stepmom and then set the example. —Brittany

    • Don’t be afraid to talk to your parents and your stepparents. Make the best of the situation. —Krista

    New Siblings

    Forming relationships with new siblings takes time and patience.

    • We realized that we were all in this together, and we learned to accept each other as brothers and sisters. We try not to use the terms “step” or “half.” —Brian

    • Spend quality time together to build unity. We have a lot of fun hanging out together. —Brittany

    • Learn to accept and appreciate each other, and try not to criticize. Talk about how you feel and forgive each other. —Lara

    • Talk things out and don’t let resentment build. Each member is important, and we need to support one another. —Katie

    Working through Divorce Issues

    You may feel resentment, confusion, or unnecessary fear that somehow you caused the divorce. Putting your faith in the Lord can help you through hard times.

    • I had a hard time understanding how my parents could divorce if they loved me. Then I realized that life isn’t always “squeaky-clean.” Prayer and soul-searching helped me to accept my parents’ divorce. —Brian

    • Let go of anger. Forgiving others will give you peace, clarity of thought, and understanding. If you don’t like some things about your family, make a plan to do things differently for your future family. —Ben

    Support from Others

    People around you can help you work through issues that come up.

    • My grandparents were always there for me. I knew I could go to their home when I needed to get away for awhile. —Jonathan

    • My Young Women leaders gave me time and understanding when I needed it. —Lara

    • Talk to your parents, a leader, a friend, or an older sibling about how you feel. —Shannon

    • At a family reunion with all my parents and brothers and sisters, I realized that they were a team, they loved us all, and that we would be OK. Regardless of the shape, size, or way our family came about, our hearts know one another and we are a family. —Brittany