Seminary
    Lesson 160: Moroni 10:8–34
    Footnotes
    Theme

    “Lesson 160: Moroni 10:8–34,” 2017 Book of Mormon Seminary Teacher Manual (2017)

    “Lesson 160,” 2017 BoM Seminary Teacher Manual

    Lesson 160

    Moroni 10:8–34

    Introduction

    After teaching how to obtain a witness of the truth of all things through the Holy Ghost, Moroni exhorted those who would read his words to receive and recognize spiritual gifts. Moroni concluded the Book of Mormon record by exhorting all people to come unto Jesus Christ, lay hold on every good gift He offers, and be perfected through Him.

    Suggestions for Teaching

    Moroni 10:8–29

    Moroni teaches about gifts of the Spirit and their purpose in the Lord’s work

    Invite students to think of a time when they needed Heavenly Father’s help to do something that they could not do on their own. Ask a few students to share their experiences with the class. (For example, students may have needed guidance in knowing how to help a family member or friend. Or they may have needed Heavenly Father’s help to succeed on a difficult test in school or to fulfill a particular Church calling or assignment.) You may also want to share an experience.

    Ask a student to read Moroni 10:8 aloud. Invite the class to follow along, looking for the phrase that describes the spiritual abilities or blessings God gives to the faithful.

    • How did Moroni refer to the spiritual abilities or blessings God gives to the faithful? (“Gifts of God.” Explain that we often refer to these gifts as gifts of the Spirit or spiritual gifts.)

    • What truth can we learn from Moroni 10:8 about why God grants gifts of the Spirit to His children? (After students respond, write the following truth on the board: God grants gifts of the Spirit to profit His children. You may need to explain that in this context, profit means to bless or help.)

    Invite several students to take turns reading aloud from Moroni 10:9–17. Ask the class to follow along, looking for the gifts of the Spirit that Moroni described in these verses. Invite students to consider marking what they find.

    • Which gifts of the Spirit did you find in these verses?

    • What examples of these gifts have you seen in the Church?

    • How can gifts of the Spirit profit the person who receives them?

    • When have you seen people receive blessings because others have exercised their spiritual gifts? (You may want to be prepared to share an example that you have seen.)

    Invite a student to read Moroni 10:18–19, 24 aloud. Ask the class to follow along, looking for what can prevent someone from receiving spiritual gifts.

    • What can prevent someone from receiving spiritual gifts?

    • Why do you think people in a condition of unbelief cannot recognize or receive the power and gifts of God?

    Summarize Moroni 10:20–23 by explaining that Moroni wrote about the need to have faith, hope, and charity in order to receive the gifts of God and to be saved in His kingdom.

    Invite a student to read Moroni 10:23 aloud. Ask the class to follow along, looking for a blessing of having faith. (Before students read, you may want to explain that the phrase “expedient unto me” refers to things that are in harmony with God’s will.)

    • What blessing did Moroni teach would come to those who have faith?

    • What principle can we identify in verse 23? (As students respond, write the following principle on the board: If we have faith, we will be able to do all that the Savior wants us to do. Invite students to consider marking this principle in Moroni 10:23.)

    • When have you exercised faith in the Savior to accomplish something He wanted you to do?

    Invite students to apply the truths they have learned by seeking spiritual gifts and exercising faith in Jesus Christ to help them accomplish the things He wants them to do.

    Summarize Moroni 10:25–29 by explaining that Moroni warned that those who reject the gifts and power of God through unbelief will experience sorrow and suffering. Moroni also testified that what he had written was true.

    Moroni 10:30–34

    Moroni invites all to come unto Jesus Christ and be perfected in Him

    To prepare students to identify a principle in Moroni 10:30–34, invite students to respond to the following question:

    • Is it possible for us to be perfect?

    After a brief discussion ask a student to read 3 Nephi 12:48 aloud.

    • What did the Savior say is the ultimate aim for each of us? (To become perfect.)

    Explain that in the final verses of the Book of Mormon, Moroni taught how it is possible for us to become perfect.

    Copy the following chart on the board, leaving out the answers in parentheses.

    What I must do

    What God promises

    (Answers may include that we must come unto Jesus Christ; seek for and receive good gifts; avoid evil gifts and unclean things; deny ourselves of all ungodliness; and love God with all our might, mind, and strength.)

    (Answers may include that He will fulfill His covenants; His grace will be sufficient for us; we will be perfect in Jesus Christ; we will receive the grace of God; we will be sanctified and receive a remission of our sins; and we will become holy, without spot.)

    Ask a few students to take turns reading aloud from Moroni 10:30–33. Invite the class to follow along, looking for phrases that describe what we must do and what God promises to do to help us become pure and perfect.

    • Which phrases in these verses describe what we must do and what God promises to do to help us become pure and perfect? (Invite a student to record students’ responses in the appropriate columns of the chart.)

    Point out that the word grace refers to the divine help and strength we receive because of Jesus Christ (see Bible Dictionary, “Grace”). The word sanctified means having been made “free from sin, pure, clean, and holy through the Atonement of Jesus Christ (Moses 6:59–60)” (Guide to the Scriptures, “Sanctification,” scriptures.lds.org).

    • How would you summarize as a principle what Moroni taught about becoming pure and perfect? (Students may use different words, but their answers should reflect the following principle: As we come unto Jesus Christ, we can be purified and perfected in Him.)

    Point out that some people may become discouraged because of their imperfections. Invite a student to read aloud the following statement by President Russell M. Nelson of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. Ask the class to listen for when we can ultimately become perfect.

    Nelson, Russell M.

    “We need not be dismayed if our earnest efforts toward perfection now seem so arduous [or difficult] and endless. Perfection is pending. It can come in full only after the Resurrection and only through the Lord. It awaits all who love him and keep his commandments” (Russell M. Nelson, “Perfection Pending,” Ensign, Nov. 1995, 88).

    • According to President Nelson, when can we ultimately become perfect?

    • Why is it important to know that it is only through Jesus Christ that we can become pure and perfect?

    Share your testimony that as we come unto Jesus Christ, we can be purified and perfected in Him.

    Invite students to choose one or two of the phrases from the first column of the chart on the board that indicate what we can do to become pure and perfect through Jesus Christ. Give them a few minutes to write in their class notebooks or study journals any thoughts or impressions they have about how they can improve in these areas.

    Conclude this lesson by reading Moroni 10:34 to the class. Ask students to follow along, looking for how Moroni finished the Book of Mormon.

    Invite a student to read aloud the following statement by Elder Jeffrey R. Holland of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, who shared the following thoughts on Moroni’s concluding words in the Book of Mormon:

    Holland, Jeffrey R.

    “Thus the Book of Mormon ends … on the promise of the Holy Resurrection [see Revelation 14:6]. That is most fitting, for this sacred testament—written by prophets, delivered by angels, protected by God—speaks as one ‘crying from the dead,’ exhorting all to come unto Christ and be perfected in him, a process culminating in the perfection of celestial glory” (Jeffrey R. Holland, Christ and the New Covenant: The Messianic Message of the Book of Mormon [1997], 339).

    Consider using this segment from the Book of Mormon Videos as you teach this part (see the Book of Mormon Videos: Seminary Teacher Instructions).

    Invite students to write any thoughts or impressions they have as they conclude this year’s course of study on the Book of Mormon. Consider inviting students to share what they have written with the class. Testify of the blessings Heavenly Father has promised them if they will come unto Jesus Christ by following His teachings and exercising faith in Him. Encourage students to make their study of the Book of Mormon a lifelong pursuit.

    Commentary and Background Information

    Moroni 10:8–19. Gifts of the Spirit

    Elder Bruce R. McConkie (1915–1985) of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles described the purposes and reasons for spiritual gifts:

    McConkie, Bruce R.

    “[The purpose of spiritual gifts] is to enlighten, encourage, and edify the faithful so that they will inherit peace in this life and be guided toward eternal life in the world to come. Their presence is proof of the divinity of the Lord’s work; where they are not found, there the Church and kingdom of God is not. The promise is that they shall never be done away as long as the earth continues in its present state, except for unbelief (Moro. 10:19), but when the perfect day comes and the saints obtain exaltation, there will be no more need for them. As Paul expressed it, ‘When that which is perfect is come, then that which is in part shall be done away.’ [1 Cor. 13:10.]

    “Faithful persons are expected to seek the gifts of the Spirit with all their hearts. They are to ‘covet earnestly the best gifts’ (1 Cor. 12:31; D. & C. 46:8), to ‘desire spiritual gifts’ (1 Cor. 14:1), ‘to ask of God, who giveth liberally.’ (D. & C. 46:7; Matt. 7:7–8.) To some will be given one gift; to others, another; and ‘unto some it may be given to have all those gifts, that there may be a head, in order that every member may be profited thereby.’ (D. & C. 46:29.)” (Bruce R. McConkie, Mormon Doctrine, 2nd ed. [1966], 314).

    Elder Marvin J. Ashton (1915–1994) of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles taught:

    Ashton, Marvin J. 1990

    “One of the great tragedies of life, it seems to me, is when a person classifies himself as someone who has no talents or gifts. …

    “From Doctrine and Covenants 46:11–12, we have this truth: ‘For all have not every gift given unto them; for there are many gifts, and to every man is given a gift by the Spirit of God.

    “‘To some is given one, and to some is given another, that all may be profited thereby.’

    “God has given each of us one or more special talents. … It is up to each of us to search for and build upon the gifts which God has given. …

    “Let us review some … less-conspicuous gifts: the gift of asking; the gift of listening; the gift of hearing and using a still, small voice; the gift of being able to weep; the gift of avoiding contention; the gift of being agreeable; the gift of avoiding vain repetition; the gift of seeking that which is righteous; the gift of not passing judgment; the gift of looking to God for guidance; the gift of being a disciple; the gift of caring for others; the gift of being able to ponder; the gift of offering prayer; the gift of bearing a mighty testimony; and the gift of receiving the Holy Ghost. …

    “God does live. He does bless us with gifts. As we develop and share our God-given gifts and benefit from the gifts of those around us, the world can be a better place and God’s work will move forward at a more rapid pace” (Marvin J. Ashton, “There Are Many Gifts,” Ensign, Nov. 1987, 20, 23).