Lunch Lessons
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    “Lunch Lessons,” Ensign, Jan. 2002, 68

    Lunch Lessons

    My husband and I had set a goal to teach our children the gospel on a daily basis, but the question was how? Our children are young: two preschoolers and one in kindergarten. I tried scheduling time in the morning for a gospel lesson, but that always seemed to get pushed aside for housework, errands, or projects. We also tried to discuss the gospel just before bedtime, but we were usually too tired.

    Finally I found a time that worked: lunchtime. While my three little ones ate their sandwiches, I read to them from the Book of Mormon. Yet they frequently lost interest even though I tried to explain the verses.

    Our answer finally came when we discovered a wonderful resource available through the Church’s Distribution Centers—the Gospel Art Picture Kit (item no. 34730; U.S. $25.00) which we began using during lunchtime. This was the perfect combination! The pictures, which focus on scripture stories in the Old Testament, New Testament, Book of Mormon, and Church history, gave our children something to look at. The simplified story with corresponding scripture references on the back of each picture gave me a ready-made lesson.

    We started with the first picture in the Book of Mormon section, which I showed to them as they ate. I told them the story from the back and then read a verse or two out of the scriptures. They loved it! They even asked me questions about details in the pictures.

    After each short discussion, I reinforced the story in their minds by asking them questions about it. We talked about ways they could apply the scripture story in their own lives. I then bore my testimony to them of the truthfulness of what I was teaching them. I knew that along with reading the scriptures, this was another sure way to bring the Spirit of the Lord into our lessons.

    The following day, before we looked at a new picture, we reviewed the previous day’s story. I was amazed at how much my two older children retained. For example, when we reviewed Moroni’s visit to the Prophet Joseph Smith, our four-year-old daughter told me that Joseph Smith was tired the next day because the angel came to see him three times in the night, and he didn’t get any sleep. My two-year-old doesn’t understand as much, but she likes to look at the pictures and can repeat names and events. She frequently tells me, “I make Jesus happy,” so I believe the Spirit is in our lessons and knowledge is being stored in her mind and heart.

    Using pictures from the Gospel Art Picture Kit during lunchtime has been an easy way for us to study the scriptures consistently. Now on days when I forget or think we’re too busy, it’s my children who say, “Mom, don’t forget the scripture story,” or “Mom, do another one. We want to learn more.”—Roselyn Sant, Wasilla Third Ward, Wasilla Alaska Stake

    Photo by Kelly Larsen