1999
Foundation for a Career
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“Foundation for a Career,” Ensign, Oct. 1999, 18

Foundation for a Career

I remember how frightened I was during my first years of teaching Gospel Doctrine. As I would stand up to teach the material I had so carefully prepared, I would have copious notes, a knot in my stomach, and a blur of people before me. But my supportive classes always listened patiently, became involved in discussions, and helped fill in the blanks in areas where I was less familiar.

In my efforts to be prepared, it seemed I always had my scriptures open. I read as I nursed my babies, kneaded bread, cut vegetables, or did anything else that didn’t take a lot of conscious thought. As I was working on a lesson, frequently I would awake in the night with new understanding. I filled notebooks with concepts and ideas for lessons. During my times of study and prayer, I received many witnesses that were so clear and direct I could not doubt their reality.

Some time ago I was thrust into a position in which I had to establish a career on rather short notice. Although I had no college degree or special skills, I felt certain the Lord would show me what to do and help me with this problem. When I answered a newspaper ad for a promising job, I listed several skills I had acquired from teaching Sunday School and other adult classes. I was hired, and over the years I have been blessed to build a strong career based on the foundation of my teaching experiences in the Church.

Some of the direct benefits I have gained from teaching Sunday School include learning to study and to be able to organize and evaluate large amounts of information, developing sufficient poise and confidence to speak to large groups of people without being fearful, listening to different opinions and perspectives and helping groups come to a mutual understanding, and being sensitive to the promptings of the Holy Ghost in all facets of my life. I have a deep love for Sunday School because of the personal growth it has allowed me to develop.—Roseann New, Las Vegas, Nevada