May 4–10. Mosiah 11–17: “A Light … That Can Never Be Darkened”
    Footnotes
    Theme

    “May 4–10. Mosiah 11–17: ‘A Light … That Can Never Be Darkened,’” Come, Follow Me—For Primary: Book of Mormon 2020 (2020)

    “May 4–10. Mosiah 11–17,” Come, Follow Me—For Primary: 2020

    Scripture Stories Illustrations

    Abinadi before King Noah, by Andrew Bosley

    May 4–10

    Mosiah 11–17

    “A Light … That Can Never Be Darkened”

    Ponder and pray to know how you can use the story of Abinadi and his teachings in Mosiah 11–17 to help the children you teach. Record the impressions you receive.

    Record Your Impressions

    Integrated Curriculum Illustration

    Invite Sharing

    Allow the children to share what they know about the story of Abinadi and King Noah. The picture in this week’s outline in Come, Follow Me—For Individuals and Families could help.

    Integrated Curriculum Illustration

    Teach the Doctrine: Younger Children

    Mosiah 11–1317

    I can stand for truth, even when I stand alone.

    Both Abinadi and Alma were courageous in defending the truth. How can you use this story to build the children’s courage for moments when they may have to defend their beliefs?

    Possible Activities

    • Summarize the account of Abinadi, King Noah, and Alma found in Mosiah 11–13 and 17. You might use “Chapter 14: Abinadi and King Noah” (Book of Mormon Stories, 38–42, or the corresponding video on ChurchofJesusChrist.org). Invite the children to act out the account, giving them turns to play different roles.

    • March in place with the children as they sing a song that inspires courage, such as “I Will Be Valiant” (Children’s Songbook, 162). Read the words of the song together, and help the children identify what a valiant or courageous person does. Select a few verses from Mosiah 11–13 and 17 to read to the children to show how Abinadi and Alma were valiant (for example, see Mosiah 13:1–4, 9).

    Mosiah 12:33–36; 13:11–24

    I should obey the Ten Commandments.

    King Noah’s priests knew the commandments but did not follow them. Abinadi’s words can help the children understand the importance of obeying the commandments.

    Possible Activities

    • Invite the children to count to 10. Or give them 10 numbered pieces of paper and let them put the papers in order. Explain that Heavenly Father gave us Ten Commandments to help us return to live with Him. Help the children recite with you some of the Ten Commandments from Mosiah 12:33–36 and 13:11–24.

    • Show a picture of Moses with the Ten Commandments (such as Gospel Art Book, no. 14), and briefly explain how Moses received the commandments from God (see Exodus 19–20). Then show a picture of Abinadi (see this week’s outline in Come, Follow Me—For Individuals and Families), and tell the children that Abinadi reminded King Noah and his priests about the Ten Commandments. Choose a few of the commandments from Mosiah 12:33–36 and 13:11–24 that you feel are particularly important for the children you teach, and discuss with them the blessings that come from obeying those commandments.

    • Sing together a song about commandments, such as “Keep the Commandments” (Children’s Songbook, 146–47). Why do we keep the commandments?

    Mosiah 14:5; 15:7–9

    Prophets bravely testify of Jesus Christ.

    Abinadi taught King Noah and others about Jesus Christ, even when it was dangerous. How can Abinadi’s account strengthen the children’s testimonies of prophets?

    Possible Activities

    • Share with the children some of the things Abinadi taught about Jesus Christ in Mosiah 14:5 and 15:7–9. Help the children understand that Abinadi wanted King Noah and his people to follow Jesus so they could be happy. In our day, living prophets teach us about the Savior. Read an excerpt from general conference, or share a video clip of one of the living prophets sharing his testimony of Jesus Christ (for example, see the “Special Witnesses of Christ” videos on ChurchofJesusChrist.org).

    • Show or draw pictures of chains, a jail, and a fire. Teach the children that Abinadi was willing to be tied up, put in jail, and even burned by fire to share his testimony of Jesus Christ. Even though we will probably never face these dangers, how can we be courageous like Abinadi in sharing our testimonies with both our words and our choices?

    Integrated Curriculum Illustration

    Teach the Doctrine: Older Children

    Mosiah 11–1317

    I can stand for the right, even when I stand alone.

    How can you prepare the children you teach to courageously stand for the right, even if they must do so alone?

    Possible Activities

    • Invite the children to draw pictures of different parts of the account of Abinadi, King Noah, and Alma found in Mosiah 11–13 and 17. Help them use their pictures to retell the story, or use “Chapter 14: Abinadi and King Noah” (Book of Mormon Stories, 38–42, or the corresponding video on ChurchofJesusChrist.org). How did Abinadi and Alma each stand for the right? Why didn’t King Noah stand for the right? (see Mosiah 17:11–12). Help the children think of times when they stood up for what’s right.

    • Help the children think of scenarios in which they could stand for the right, and invite them to role-play some of these situations. For example, what could they do when someone tries to get them to watch an inappropriate movie or when their friends don’t want to include someone in a game they are playing?

    • Show the video “Dare to Stand Alone” (ChurchofJesusChrist.org). How was President Thomas S. Monson like Abinadi?

    Mosiah 12:33–36; 13:11–24

    I should obey the Ten Commandments.

    Abinadi taught King Noah and his wicked priests about the Ten Commandments. Do the children you teach understand why we should love and obey God’s commandments?

    Possible Activities

    • Assign each child to read one of the commandments in Mosiah 12:35 and 13:11–24. Help the children think of creative ways to help each other remember each commandment (such as a rhyming phrase, an action, or an acronym). The song “The Commandments” (Children’s Songbook, 112–13) can also help. Give the children heart-shaped pieces of paper, and invite them to write one or more of the Ten Commandments on their hearts (see Mosiah 13:11)—perhaps one they feel they should try harder to obey.

      Madagascar: Family Life

      The scriptures teach us God’s commandments.

    • Sing together a song about the commandments, such as “Keep the Commandments” (Children’s Songbook, 146–47). What blessings come from keeping the commandments?

    Mosiah 14:6; 16:4–9

    When I sin, I become lost; because of Jesus Christ, I can be found.

    To teach about Jesus Christ, Abinadi quoted the prophet Isaiah, who compared us to lost sheep. How can you use this comparison to teach the children about the Savior?

    Possible Activities

    • Invite the children to share experiences when they lost something or were lost themselves. How did they feel? What did they do? Read together Mosiah 14:6 and 16:4–9. How do we sometimes go “astray” from God? How does Jesus Christ help us come back?

    • Invite the children to imagine a herd of sheep. What are some reasons one of the sheep might get lost? List their answers on the board. How are we like sheep who wander? How might Heavenly Father feel when we are “found” through repentance and the Savior’s Atonement? (see Doctrine and Covenants 18:10–13). Share your testimony of the Savior and of repentance.

    Integrated Curriculum Illustration

    Encourage Learning at Home

    Invite the children to ask their family members to share experiences in which they stood for truth, or encourage the children to share their own experiences.

    Improving Our Teaching

    Repetition is key to learning. Children benefit from hearing a gospel principle or doing an activity more than once. Try repeating activities in a variety of ways.

    Abinadi in Chains