Comment
    Footnotes
    Theme

    “Comment,” Ensign, Jan. 1992, 79–80

    Comment

    I Have Found Strength

    My husband is not a member of the Church, and I have spent years trying to get him to attend church. During those times when I could not attend meetings or activities, I found great joy and was uplifted by reading the Ensign.

    Unfortunately, my husband has still not joined the Church. But I have found the strength to take control of my life and to attend meetings on a regular basis, as well as to get involved.

    Many members such as myself have been less-active but have wanted to become involved. Articles from the Ensign and help from my visiting teachers have finally brought me to life again.

    Name Withheld

    Christus

    One of the most inspirational sites in the Church is the statue of the Savior in the rotunda of the North Visitors’ Center on Temple Square. Millions of visitors have appreciated the work of sculptor Bertel Thorvaldsen in this, his most famous rendering—The Christus.

    The background of how this work came to be on Temple Square is interesting. In the late 1950’s Elder Stephen L Richards, then first counselor to President David O. McKay, was on a Church assignment to Denmark where he saw The Christus in Copenhagen. Elder and Sister Richards were inspired by the beauty and feeling of this great work.

    Through Herbert Eaton, the owner of Forest Lawn Cemetery in California, which contains many great art treasures, Elder Richards was able to order a reproduction of The Christus to present to the Church.

    Four years elapsed between the passing of Elder Richards and the placing of his gift in the Visitors’ Center on Temple Square. President David O. McKay dedicated the building in 1963.

    Philip L. Richards
    Sandy, Utah

    Encore of the Spirit

    Thank you, thank you for telling us of the tour of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir through eastern Europe and Russia (October).

    Your articles made the events so clear and powerful. My tears came again and again while reading and visualizing the impact upon those who gave and those who received—binding together the hearts and feelings of many people for the glory of God.

    Helen J. Anderson
    Townsend, Montana

    Please Don’t Dwell on Our Mistakes

    I am a less-active member of the Church. Although I have a testimony of the gospel, I feel very uncomfortable attending Church services.

    A friend of mine wants me to return to Church activity. Unfortunately, in her desire to help, she has constantly criticized how I am living my life. I realize she wants to help me, but in the process she has hurt my feelings deeply.

    To those members who are trying to activate less-active friends—please don’t dwell on our mistakes. We need your love and support. The more you criticize our errors, the more you push us away from you. We need you to set an example of love, not to name our sins one by one. Yet don’t ignore us as if we didn’t exist.

    Name Withheld

    The Church’s Early Days in Sioux Falls

    The article about the growth of the Church in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, in the January 1991 issue brought back many memories. But I was disappointed that it didn’t give more details about the Church prior to 1949.

    Before the branch was organized on 19 June 1949, Sioux Falls was the headquarters of the South Dakota District in the North Central States Mission. In the early 1930s, it was the only place in the state where regular meetings were held. My mother, Mabel Juber, two of my brothers, and one of my sisters were all baptized in Sioux Falls in 1931. The rest of us were baptized as we came of age.

    Brother Adler (mentioned in the article), along with the Conklins, the Rundbergs, and a few others, were meeting in an old Odd Fellows hall when the missionaries taught my mother. I remember many events taking place in that old hall, especially cleaning up the beer bottles before we could start our meetings on Sunday mornings. I also remember listening to Brother Adler bear his testimony each month in broken German and English. He usually used a hymnal as a reference.

    My father, who was never baptized, and my brother Delbert did much to help build the little green chapel. My mother was Relief Society president off and on through my early years, and my sisters led the music while Mom played the piano. While we were young men, my brother Delbert served in the branch presidency, and I served in the Sunday School superintendency.

    My parents moved to Salt Lake City in 1960, where they both passed away. Most of the other Church members who lived in Sioux Falls in the 1930s and 1940s are now gone as well. Many stayed in Sioux Falls until they died, and others, like my family, moved west. The only one I know who remains in Sioux Falls is Delores Rundberg Schriver—the one female branch member who was my age.

    David K. Juber
    Mesa, Arizona

    Update

    In “Two-Way Window on the World” (July 1991), it was reported that the Mormon Tabernacle Choir’s radio and television broadcasts in Denmark are aired monthly; they are now aired weekly. The Danish Tabernacle Choir Society (DTCS), which is associated with Bonneville Communications in marketing the choir’s broadcasts is unaffiliated with the Church.

    In addition to airing the choir’s “Music and the Spoken Word” program, many television stations in Denmark air nearly all available Church specials produced by Bonneville, including Mr. Krueger’s Christmas, The Last Leaf, Easter Dream, and many productions featuring the Tabernacle Choir and the Mormon Youth Symphony and Chorus.

    The Tabernacle Choir is well known in Denmark, and each week many listeners and viewers contact the broadcasting stations to inquire about how they can obtain recordings of the choir and copies of its programs.

    Enjoy It!

    Thank you for the article “Enjoy It” (June). How true it is that we often have better hindsight than foresight. If we can look to the future and catch the vision, we can better face our present challenges and difficulties. Like the author and her family, I now try to live by the motto, “No matter what ups and downs I face, I will enjoy them!”

    My new job as a nurse has presented me with countless hurdles and heavy responsibilities that are sometimes foreign and all too often overwhelming. Fortunately, the article helped me to relax and look at my challenges in a positive light—for my growth, experience, and fun!

    Henedine H. Clark
    Manteca, California

    Marriage on the Monarch

    Your article on sailing ships (July) helped solve a puzzling question m my family history research: Why were my great-grandparents married en route to America?

    There seemed to be no logical reason for their marriage at sea until l read about their ship, Monarch of the Sea. I was interested to learn that betrothed passengers were married to alleviate crowding in quarters reserved for single persons. To my delight, the mystery is solved.

    LaRue Jones
    Hixson, Tennessee

    International Art Competition

    I had the opportunity to stroll through the Museum of Church History and Art to see the large display of the Second International Art Competition. It was a memorable experience!

    If there is anything virtuous, lovely, of good report, or praiseworthy, I seek after these things. Here I found all that I was seeking.

    The artwork was done by members of the Church from all over the world who interpreted favorite verses of scripture in their own original, creative ways, using materials from their native lands.

    I want to express my gratitude to all who entered this competition for expressing their testimonies and sharing their talents with us in these beautiful ways.

    Helen Reinhold
    Salt Lake City, Utah

    I Followed the Advice

    My husband, Warner, investigated the Church because of the Improvement Era. He wanted to know more about the church that published such a fine magazine. He talked me into investigating, too. After our conversion, we subscribed to the Era, and then to the Ensign.

    Applying the knowledge I gain from your articles blesses my life: it strengthens my testimony, expands and refines my knowledge of gospel principles, and benefits my relationships. I sincerely believe my marriage was as strong as it was because I followed advice given in the Ensign. Now that I am a widow, I find your articles for single adults helpful. I assume the magazine will continue to bless my life. Thank you for your efforts in my behalf.

    Elizabeth Whipple
    Austin, Texas