Scripture Stories
Chapter 52: The Relief Society: March 1842
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“Chapter 52: The Relief Society: March 1842,” Doctrine and Covenants Stories (2002), 186–89

“Chapter 52,” Doctrine and Covenants Stories, 186–89

Chapter 52

The Relief Society

March 1842

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The Saints were building the temple in Nauvoo. The men’s clothes were wearing out, and the women wanted to help them. One woman said she would make clothes for the men, but she didn’t have money to buy cloth.

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Sarah Kimball said she would give the woman some cloth. Sister Kimball also asked other women to help. The women had a meeting in Sister Kimball’s home and decided to start a society for women in the Church.

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The women asked Eliza R. Snow to write some rules for the society. She took the rules to Joseph Smith. He said the rules were good, but he also said the Lord had a better plan for the women.

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Joseph Smith asked the women to come to a meeting. He said priesthood leaders would help the women with their society. Emma Smith was chosen to be the leader of the women. They called their group the Relief Society.

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Joseph Smith told the women to help people who were sick or poor. They should give people any help they needed. The bishop would help the women know what to do.

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The women had meetings to learn the things they needed to know. They were very glad they could help the members of the Church.

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The women made clothes for the men who were building the temple. They also made items to be used in the temple.

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The women took food to people who needed it. They took care of people who were sick and did many other things to help the Saints.

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All women in the Church belong to the Relief Society. They help people. They learn about the gospel. They learn about good books, music, and art. They learn how to strengthen their families. (Source for this chapter: History of Relief Society, 1842–1966 [1967].)