Acquiring Spiritual Knowledge
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“Acquiring Spiritual Knowledge,” Doctrinal Mastery Book of Mormon Teacher Material (2017)

“Acquiring Spiritual Knowledge,” Doctrinal Mastery Book of Mormon Teacher Material

Acquiring Spiritual Knowledge

Note: Parts 1 and 2 of this learning experience can be taught over the course of two 40-minute class sessions, or they can be combined and taught in one 80-minute session. If you have less than 180 teaching days, you could teach part 1 of this learning experience in place of lesson 1, “The Role of the Learner,” in the Book of Mormon Seminary Teacher Manual.

Part 1 (40 minutes)

Increasing Our Understanding and Testimony of Spiritual Truth

Invite a student to read aloud the following account given by Sister Sheri L. Dew, who served as Second Counselor in the Relief Society General Presidency:

Dew, Sheri L 2001

“A marvelous young woman … called me, distraught. Through sobs she blurted, ‘I’m not sure I believe the Church is true anymore, and I’m scared. What if my family isn’t going to be together forever?’” (Sheri L. Dew, “Will You Engage in the Wrestle?” [Brigham Young University–Idaho devotional, May 17, 2016], byui.edu/devotionals).

Invite students to consider if they or someone they know has experienced concerns and feelings similar to those experienced by the young woman Sister Dew spoke of.

  • If this young woman came to you for help, what might you say or do to help her?

Invite a student to continue reading Sister Dew’s account aloud:

“I asked, ‘Do you want a testimony?’ ‘Yes,’ she said.

“‘Are you willing to work for it?’ Again, ‘Yes’” (Sheri L. Dew, “Will You Engage in the Wrestle?” byui.edu/devotionals).

  • Why do you think it might have been helpful to ask this young woman if she desired a testimony of the gospel and if she was willing to work for it?

Explain that during their experience in seminary, students will have many opportunities to work to increase their understanding and testimony of the gospel and to learn how to find answers to their questions and the questions others may have about the Church—including its teachings and history. One opportunity they have to do this is through Doctrinal Mastery. Doctrinal Mastery includes seeking to learn and apply principles of acquiring spiritual knowledge and developing a deeper understanding of key doctrines of the gospel of Jesus Christ.

God Is the Source of All Truth

Provide students with copies of the Doctrinal Mastery Core Document, and ask them to open to the “Acquiring Spiritual Knowledge” section. Invite a student to read the first paragraph aloud. Ask the class to follow along, looking for what it teaches about the source of all truth.

  • Who is the source of all truth? (Invite students to consider marking the following doctrine: God knows all things and is the source of all truth.)

  • Which doctrinal mastery passage supports this doctrine? (You may want to invite students to consider marking Mosiah 4:9 in a distinctive way in their scriptures so they will be able to locate it easily.)

Invite a student to read Mosiah 4:9 aloud. Ask the class to follow along, looking for how this verse helps us understand why we should look to God as we search for truth.

  • What words or phrases in this verse help us understand why we should look to God as we search for truth?

  • What experiences have helped you know that God knows all things and is the source of all truth? (You may want to remind students not to share experiences that are too sacred or personal.)

How to Acquire Spiritual Knowledge

Write the following heading on the board: The pattern God has given to help us acquire spiritual knowledge.

  • How would you explain what a pattern is? (Help students understand that one definition of a pattern is a model that helps us understand the correct way of doing something—particularly something that will be done repeatedly. As an example, you may want to display a pattern that can be used for making something.)

Invite a student to read aloud the second paragraph of the “Acquiring Spiritual Knowledge” section in the Doctrinal Mastery Core Document. Ask the class to follow along, looking for four things we must do to follow the pattern God has given to help us acquire spiritual knowledge.

  • Based on what we read in this paragraph, what four things must we do to follow the pattern God has given to help us acquire spiritual knowledge?

Write students’ responses under the heading on the board as follows:

  1. Have an honest desire to know the truth.

  2. Be willing to live according to the truth that God has revealed.

  3. Seek truth through prayer.

  4. Seek truth through a serious study of the word of God.

Ask the class:

  • Why do you think it is important for us to apply God’s pattern for acquiring spiritual knowledge every day and not just when we have pressing questions or concerns? (It is important that we apply this pattern every day because doing these things invites the Spirit of the Lord to always be with us and can help us recognize the influence of the Holy Ghost. By consistently following this pattern, we demonstrate to the Lord our desire to acquire spiritual knowledge at all times—not just when we have pressing questions or concerns.)

Refer students again to the second paragraph of the “Acquiring Spiritual Knowledge” section in the Doctrinal Mastery Core Document.

  • Which of the doctrinal mastery passages in the Book of Mormon support God’s pattern for acquiring spiritual knowledge? (As students respond, write the following references on the board: Moroni 10:4–5; 2 Nephi 32:8–9; 2 Nephi 32:3; this is the order of the scriptures in the second paragraph.)

Divide students into three groups. Assign each group to study one of the Book of Mormon doctrinal mastery passages listed on the board, looking for scriptural phrases that teach God’s pattern for acquiring spiritual knowledge. After sufficient time, invite one or more students from each group to report what they found. As they do so, consider asking questions such as the following:

  • What do you think it means to “ask God … with a sincere heart, with real intent” (Moroni 10:4)? (Help students understand that this phrase means that we truly desire to receive an answer from God and intend to act on the answer we receive.)

Invite a student to read the following statement by President Russell M. Nelson of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles aloud:

Nelson, Russell M.

“‘Real intent’ means that one really intends to follow the divine direction given” (Russell M. Nelson, “Ask, Seek, Knock,” Ensign or Liahona, Nov. 2009, 81).

  • Why do you think it is important that we seek truth with a sincere heart and that we really intend to follow the direction God gives us?

  • What do you think it means to “pray always” (2 Nephi 32:9)?

  • What do you think is the difference between reading casually and “feast[ing] upon the words of Christ” (2 Nephi 32:3)?

  • How can choosing to pray always and to feast upon the words of Christ help us acquire spiritual knowledge?

Invite students to share experiences they have had with applying God’s pattern for acquiring spiritual knowledge. As they do so, invite them to also explain what blessings they received as a result. You may also want to share an experience.

Asking Questions and Seeking Answers Is a Vital Part of Our Effort to Learn Truth

Ask students to consider if they think it is good for people to ask questions about the teachings of the Church or aspects of Church history that may be difficult to understand.

Invite a student to read aloud the third paragraph of the “Acquiring Spiritual Knowledge” section in the Doctrinal Mastery Core Document. Ask students to follow along, looking for what this paragraph teaches about the role of asking questions and seeking answers in our effort to learn truth.

  • What is the role of asking questions and seeking answers in our effort to learn truth? (After students respond, write the following statement of truth on the board: Asking questions and seeking answers is a vital part of our effort to learn truth.)

  • Why do you think asking questions and seeking answers is a vital part of our effort to learn truth?

  • According to what we learn in the third paragraph, why does our attitude and intent matter when we ask questions? (Help students identify the following truth: The attitude and intent with which we ask questions and seek answers will greatly affect our ability to learn through the Holy Ghost. You may want to suggest that students mark this principle in their copy of the Doctrinal Mastery Core Document.)

Remind students of the account of the young woman who contacted Sister Sheri L. Dew because she was worried about whether the teachings of the Church are true. Explain that the young woman decided to meet with her bishop and with others—including Sister Dew—who could help her find answers to her questions.

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Provide each student with a copy of the accompanying handout. Explain that this handout contains Sister Dew’s account of what happened as the young woman sought for answers to her questions. Invite several students to take turns reading aloud from the account. Ask the class to follow along, looking for how the attitude and intent with which we ask questions and seek answers affects our ability to learn through the Holy Ghost.

After students have read the first three paragraphs, ask:

  • How might this young woman’s attitude and intent as a seeker of truth have affected her ability to find answers to her questions?

Then invite several students to take turns reading aloud the rest of Sister Dew’s account in the handout.

DOCTRINAL MASTERY BOOK OF MORMON TEACHER MATERIAL:
Dew, Sheri L 2001

“I told [the young woman], ‘Bring your scriptures and every question you have. Questions are good. Let’s see what the Lord will teach us.’

“She took me at my word and brought one thorny question after another. We searched the scriptures and the teachings of prophets for answers. Little by little, she began to realize that just because she had questions didn’t mean she didn’t have a testimony. The scriptures are filled with accounts of prophets who had questions. And she began to recognize when the Spirit was bearing witness to her—including bearing witness that prophets, seers, and revelators are truly prophets.

“Her testimony began to grow, and time passed. Then about a year ago she called again. ‘I wanted you to be one of the first to know that I am holding in my hand a temple recommend. Will you come when I receive my endowment?’ Then she added, ‘Do you know what you said that helped me the most? You told me that questions are good, and that allowed me to see myself as a seeker rather than a doubter.’

“I was overjoyed! But two days later, I received a much different call from another [young woman]. ‘Sister Dew,’ she said, ‘before you hear it from someone else, I want you to know that I’m pregnant.’ She said that for several years she had doubted the truthfulness of the gospel and had finally decided there was no reason to live the law of chastity.

“I told her that I was not her judge and that I loved her. Then I asked her if she would like to have a testimony. ‘No, I don’t think so,’ she said.

“The contrast was stunning. At about the same time, these two young women had questions that threatened their testimonies. One of them sent out a cry for help, and family, friends and leaders followed President Monson’s counsel and went to her rescue. The other girl nursed her doubt and convinced herself that her immoral choices were acceptable. …

“One girl’s questions propelled her to become a seeker of truth. The other girl used her questions to justify her immorality.

“My dear friends, questions are good. Questions are good if they are inspired questions, asked in faith, and asked of credible sources where the Spirit will direct and confirm the answer. …

“None of us are entitled to revelation without effort on our part. Answers from God don’t just magically appear. If we want to grow spiritually, the Lord expects us to ask questions and seek answers. ‘If thou shalt ask,’ He promised, ‘thou shalt receive revelation upon revelation, knowledge upon knowledge’ [D&C 42:61]. How much clearer can it be? The Lord loves inspired questions asked in faith because they lead to knowledge, to revelation, and to greater faith” (Sheri L. Dew, “Will You Engage in the Wrestle?” [Brigham Young University–Idaho devotional, May 17, 2016], byui.edu/devotionals).

  • How can the experiences of the two young women Sister Dew spoke of help us understand the importance of our attitude and intent when asking questions?

  • How do the experiences of the two young women help us understand our role in diligently seeking answers to our questions?

You may want to testify of the importance of asking sincere questions and diligently seeking answers. Consider sharing how you have come to know that the Lord will answer our sincere questions.

Invite students to act on what they have learned by asking sincere questions and diligently seeking answers through applying Heavenly Father’s ordained pattern for acquiring spiritual knowledge.

Part 2 (40 minutes)

Principles That Can Help Us Answer Questions

Invite students to consider what questions they may have about life or about the Church and its teachings and history.

As an example of a concern and question that some students may have or may be asked by another person, display or write the following on the board:

I hear about other people receiving answers to their prayers, but that doesn’t happen to me. It just doesn’t feel like God loves me, even though I’m trying to do what’s right. Why doesn’t God answer my prayers?

Explain to students that this portion of the learning experience on acquiring spiritual knowledge is intended to help them learn three principles that can guide them when they have questions or are presented with questions from others: act in faith, examine concepts and questions with an eternal perspective, and seek further understanding through divinely appointed sources.

Act in Faith

Invite a few students to take turns reading aloud from principle 1, “Act in Faith,” in the “Acquiring Spiritual Knowledge” section in the Doctrinal Mastery Core Document. Ask the class to follow along, looking for statements that explain what we can do to act in faith when we have questions or concerns. Invite students to consider marking statements that are especially meaningful to them.

Ask students to report what they found. As they do so, you may want to ask them to explain how following the counsel they identified could be helpful when they have questions or concerns. Point out the following statement of doctrine: As we continue to seek for answers, we must live by faith—trusting that we will eventually receive the answers we seek.

  • Which Book of Mormon doctrinal mastery passage supports this statement of doctrine? (Invite students to consider marking Ether 12:6 in a distinctive way in their scriptures so they will be able to locate it easily.)

Invite a student to read Ether 12:6 aloud. Ask the class to follow along, looking for words or phrases that help us understand why it is important for us to live by faith as we seek answers to our questions.

  • What words or phrases in this verse can help us understand why it is important that we live by faith as we seek answers to our questions?

  • What do you think it means that “ye receive no witness until after the trial of your faith” (Ether 12:6)?

Invite a student to read the following statement by President Dieter F. Uchtdorf of the First Presidency aloud. Ask the class to listen for what we can do in order to receive a witness or testimony of the truthfulness of the gospel.

Uchtdorf, Dieter F.

“As you exercise your faith, applying gospel principles every day under any circumstances, you will taste the sweet fruits of the gospel, and by this fruit you will know of its truth” (Dieter F. Uchtdorf, “The Reflection in the Water” [Church Educational System fireside for young adults, Nov. 1, 2009], LDS.org).

  • According to this statement by President Uchtdorf, what can we do in order to receive or strengthen our testimony of the truthfulness of the gospel?

  • Why do you think the Lord expects us to exercise our faith before we receive a witness or testimony of the truthfulness of the gospel?

  • What is a truth you have received a testimony of by choosing to exercise your faith by applying gospel principles on a daily basis? How did that testimony come to you? (You may also want to share an experience.)

Explain that some people may question whether they have a testimony or wonder why their testimony isn’t stronger, even though they have sought to exercise their faith by living according to the Lord’s commandments.

Point out the final two statements of doctrine of principle 1, “Act in Faith,” from the “Acquiring Spiritual Knowledge” section in the Doctrinal Mastery Core Document: As we are faithful to the truth and light we have already received, we will receive more. Answers to our questions and prayers often come “line upon line, precept upon precept.” Invite students to consider marking these truths.

  • How might these truths help a person understand why his or her testimony of the gospel has not grown more quickly?

  • What doctrinal mastery passage supports these two truths? (Invite students to consider marking 2 Nephi 28:30 in a distinctive way.)

Invite a student to read 2 Nephi 28:30 aloud. Ask the class to follow along, looking for phrases that support the truths in the Doctrinal Mastery Core Document. Invite students to report what they find.

Explain that Elder D. Todd Christofferson of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles described his experience with prayer as he and his family were faced with a trial that lasted several years. Invite a student to read the following statement by Elder Christofferson aloud. Ask the class to listen for reasons why the Lord might choose not to answer some of our questions and prayers immediately or in the way we desire.

Christofferson, D. Todd

“I prayed for some miraculous intervention to deliver us. Although I offered that prayer many times with great sincerity and earnest desire, the answer in the end was no. Finally, I learned to pray as the Savior did: ‘Nevertheless not my will, but thine, be done’ (Luke 22:42). I sought the Lord’s help with each tiny step along the way to a final resolution.

“… More than once I fell down before my Heavenly Father, begging in tears for His help. And He did help. Sometimes it was nothing more than a sense of peace, a feeling of assurance that things would work out. …

“Though I suffered then, I am grateful now that there was not a quick solution to my problem. The fact that I was forced to turn to God for help almost daily over an extended period of years taught me how to truly pray and get answers to prayer and taught me in a practical way to have faith in God. I came to know my Savior and my Heavenly Father in a way and to a degree that might not have happened otherwise or that might have taken me much longer. … I learned to trust in the Lord with all my heart. I learned to walk with Him day by day” (D. Todd Christofferson, “Recognizing God’s Hand in Our Daily Blessings” Ensign, Jan. 2012, 18–19).

  • Based on what you learned from this statement, what are some reasons why God might choose not to answer some of our questions and prayers immediately or in the way we desire? (After students respond, you may want to point out that God may also answer our prayers immediately, in very direct and powerful ways.)

Refer to the concern and question on the board.

  • If you had this concern and question, how could you choose to act in faith?

Examine Concepts and Questions with an Eternal Perspective

Ask students to think of times when they may have noticed that their religious beliefs and views on life were different than some of the beliefs and views of their friends and associates who are not members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Invite a student to read the following statement by Elder Dallin H. Oaks of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles aloud. Ask the class to listen for why Latter-day Saints often view questions relating to life and religious subjects differently than how others might view them.

Oaks, Dallin H.

“On many important subjects our assumptions [or beliefs] … are different from [those of] many of our friends and associates. They are also different from many assumptions currently used in the media. … For example, because Latter-day Saints know our Heavenly Father’s plan for His children, we know that this mortal life is not a one-act play sandwiched between an unknowable past and an uncertain future. This life is like the second act in a three-act play. Its purpose is defined by what is revealed about our spiritual existence in act 1 and our eternal destiny in act 3. Because of our knowledge of this plan and other truths that God has revealed, we start with different assumptions than those who do not share our knowledge. As a result, we reach different conclusions on many important subjects that others judge only in terms of their opinions about mortal life” (Dallin H. Oaks, “As He Thinketh in His Heart” [evening with a General Authority, Feb. 8, 2013], lds.org/broadcasts).

  • According to Elder Oaks, why do Latter-day Saints view questions relating to our life on earth and religious subjects differently than how others might view them? (As students respond, draw the following diagram on the board.)

Doctrinal Mastery Book of Mormon Teacher Material

Cover up the sections for acts 1 and 3, and ask the following question:

  • What is an example of an important subject that we might view differently if we didn’t have knowledge of our premortal life or of life after death? (Students could mention a number of subjects, such as the value we place on human life or that we will receive God-given consequences for our choices at the Final Judgment.)

Invite a student to read the following statement by Elder Oaks aloud. Explain that he was speaking to seminary and institute of religion teachers. Ask the class to listen for what he said students should do when they are presented with a difficult concept or question.

Oaks, Dallin H.

“I suggest that it may be preferable for our young people to refrain from arguing with their associates. … They will often be better off to respond by identifying the worldly premises or assumptions in the assertions they face and then by identifying the different assumptions or premises that guide the thinking of Latter-day Saints” (Dallin H. Oaks, “As He Thinketh in His Heart,” lds.org/broadcasts).

  • Based on Elder Oaks’s suggestion, what can we do when we are presented with a difficult concept or question? (You may need to help students understand that a premise is an idea that is used to support a conclusion and that an assertion is a declaration of a person’s position, point of view, or opinion.)

To illustrate how a person’s beliefs or assumptions can influence the answers he or she arrives at, place or draw a simple frame around the concern and question written on the board.

Doctrinal Mastery Book of Mormon Teacher Material

Explain that this simple frame represents the beliefs or assumptions a person asking this question might have if he or she did not view the question in the context of what we know about Heavenly Father, His plan of salvation, and the teachings of Jesus Christ. Point out that when considering a person’s beliefs or assumptions, we should do so with kindness and respect, being sensitive to the person’s feelings and to the guidance of the Holy Ghost.

  • What are some beliefs or assumptions that may not be accurate and could influence a person to have this concern and question?

Write students’ responses on the board around the frame. These could include the following:

God answers everyone’s prayers in the same way.

God loves some of His children, but He doesn’t really love me.

God doesn’t love me if He doesn’t answer my prayers in the way I hope and expect Him to.

If I am trying to do what’s right, then God should answer all my prayers immediately.

  • Why do you think it is important to think about the beliefs or assumptions that we or others might have when asking questions about God, our life on earth, or the Church and its teachings and history? (Help students see that doing this can help us better understand the underlying concerns or the limited perspective the question may be based on.)

  • How might the beliefs or assumptions on the board indicate that the person may be viewing the question with a limited perspective?

Invite a student to read aloud principle 2, “Examine Concepts and Questions with an Eternal Perspective,” in the “Acquiring Spiritual Knowledge” section in the Doctrinal Mastery Core Document. Ask the class to follow along, looking for how we can examine concepts and questions with an eternal perspective.

Ask students to report what they find. Invite students to consider marking the following truth: To examine doctrinal concepts, questions, and social issues with an eternal perspective, we consider them in the context of the plan of salvation and the teachings of the Savior. Uncover the sections for acts 1 and 3 on the board.

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To help students understand how to consider concepts and questions in the context of the plan of salvation and the teachings of the Savior, consider showing the video “Examining Questions with an Eternal Perspective” (2:55), which is available on LDS.org. Ask the class to watch for how a young woman named Lauren took time to think about the beliefs or assumptions that may have influenced her friend’s question about God and how Lauren then examined the question with an eternal perspective.

After students have watched the video, ask:

  • Why do you think it was helpful for Lauren to think about the beliefs or assumptions that may have influenced her friend’s question about God?

  • What happened as Lauren examined her friend’s question with an eternal perspective?

To help students practice examining concepts and questions with an eternal perspective, refer to the concern and question in the frame on the board and ask:

  • What do we know about Heavenly Father, His plan, and the teachings of the Savior that could help us look at this question differently and find answers based on eternal truth?

As students respond, erase the statements around the frame and replace them with the answers students give. These may include responses such as the following:

God may answer our prayers differently based on His knowledge of our individual needs and what is best for us.

God loves all His children, including me.

God loves me even when He doesn’t answer my prayers in the way I hope and expect Him to.

Even if I am trying to do what’s right, God may not answer all my prayers immediately. This provides opportunities for me to grow spiritually.

Remove or erase the simple frame around the concern and question on the board and replace it with a more beautiful frame.

Doctrinal Mastery Book of Mormon Teacher Material

Explain that this new frame represents truths we know about Heavenly Father, His plan of salvation, and the teachings of the Savior.

  • How does viewing this question in the context of what we know about Heavenly Father, His plan, and the teachings of the Savior allow us to see the question differently?

Invite students to share how they were able to better understand a concept, teaching, or concern when they considered it from an eternal perspective. You may also want to share an experience of your own.

Seek Further Understanding through Divinely Appointed Sources

Invite students to think about what sources they might turn to when they have a question about the Church or need help when making an important decision.

Invite a student to read the following statement by Elder M. Russell Ballard of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles aloud:

Ballard, M. Russell

“James did not say, ‘If any of you lack wisdom, let him Google!’” (M. Russell Ballard, “The Opportunities and Responsibilities of CES Teachers in the 21st Century” [evening with a General Authority, Feb. 26, 2016], lds.org/broadcasts).

  • According to James 1:5, what did the Apostle James teach? (“If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God.”)

  • When we have a question or concern, why do you think it is important to first look to God for help?

Invite a student to read aloud the first paragraph of principle 3, “Seek Further Understanding through Divinely Appointed Sources,” in the “Acquiring Spiritual Knowledge section in the Doctrinal Mastery Core Document. Ask the class to follow along, looking for what God has given us to help us discover and understand truth. Invite students to consider marking what they find.

  • What has God given us to help us discover and understand truth? (As part of this discussion, you may want to invite students to consider marking the following statement: As part of the Lord’s appointed process for obtaining spiritual knowledge, He has established sources through which He reveals truth and guidance to His children.)

  • What blessings can we receive as we turn to the Lord’s divinely appointed sources of truth?

Refer to the concern and question in the frame on the board.

  • What are some divinely appointed sources you could turn to if you had this concern and question?

To help students be aware of additional resources that can help them locate divinely appointed sources, consider telling them about (and if possible, showing them or inviting them to locate on their electronic devices) the official Church website mormonnewsroom.org. Explain that on this website the Church clarifies information regarding various issues of public interest related to the Church and corrects partial or incorrect information that is reported in the media. Also consider showing students the Church’s Gospel Topics page at lds.org/topics. The Gospel Topics essays contain valuable and forthright information on many difficult historical and doctrinal issues.

Invite students to share examples of how they have been blessed as they have turned to divine sources for answers when they were confronted with a question or issue. You may want to be prepared to share an example of your own.

Invite a student to read aloud the second paragraph of principle 3, “Seek Further Understanding through Divinely Appointed Sources,” in the “Acquiring Spiritual Knowledge” section in the Doctrinal Mastery Core Document. Ask the class to follow along, looking for what this paragraph teaches about sources of information that are not produced by the Church.

  • Why is it important to be wary of unreliable sources of information?

  • How can we recognize truth in sources of information that are not produced by the Church? (Help students understand that the Holy Ghost can help us recognize truth or error in whatever source we may find it [see Moroni 10:5].)

Explain that during the school year, in addition to studying the teachings of the Book of Mormon sequentially, students also will be studying the nine doctrinal topics from the Doctrinal Mastery Core Document (which correspond to topics in the Sunday youth curriculum). They will also study the Book of Mormon doctrinal mastery passages associated with each topic. As each topic is studied, they will use the principles of acquiring spiritual knowledge discussed in this lesson to consider real questions, issues, and opportunities for personal application.

Share your testimony about the importance of applying the principles of acquiring spiritual knowledge when we are faced with difficult concepts or questions. Assure students that the Lord wants to teach them through His Spirit. As we act in faith, examine concepts and questions with an eternal perspective, and seek further understanding through divinely appointed sources, God will give us answers and provide direction in our lives.

Doctrinal Mastery Review

Consider using the following activity during a separate class session to help students review the Book of Mormon doctrinal mastery passages referred to in parts 1 and 2 of this learning experience on acquiring spiritual knowledge.

Before class, write the references to the following doctrinal mastery passages on the board: 2 Nephi 28:30; 2 Nephi 32:3; 2 Nephi 32:8–9; Mosiah 4:9; Ether 12:6; Moroni 10:4–5.

Divide students into pairs. Ask them to review the doctrine taught in the passages on the board by having one student in each pair use the Doctrinal Mastery Reference Guide and, in a random order, read aloud the key phrase for each of those doctrinal mastery passages. When a key phrase is read, the other student states which passage on the board is associated with the key phrase. After a few minutes, have students switch roles with their partners.

Next, to help students become familiar with the scripture text of the doctrinal mastery passages, read a passage aloud without telling students the reference. Invite students to see if they can locate the passage and join you in reading it aloud before you have finished reading the passage. After the passage is read, invite one or more students to explain in their own words the doctrine or principle taught in the passage. Repeat this activity for each of the doctrinal mastery passages listed on the board.

DOCTRINAL MASTERY BOOK OF MORMON TEACHER MATERIAL: