1992
    Church Sends Aid to Africa
    Footnotes
    Theme

    “Church Sends Aid to Africa,” Ensign, Nov. 1992, 107–8

    Church Sends Aid to Africa

    The Church is providing a million pounds of staple foods in an aid package for Somalia and other drought-stricken African countries. The food and materials are provided by voluntary cash and in-kind donations from Church members throughout the world.

    In addition, the Church will fund several water and agriculture development projects, said officials of the Humanitarian Service Division, an arm of the Church’s Welfare Services Department.

    The channeling of food and materials to the African nations through selected relief agencies has been ongoing since June, when a request by the Church’s Africa Area Presidency for assistance was approved.

    The shipments of food have primarily consisted of dry milk, wheat flour, cornmeal, and beans. The food is targeted for supplementary feeding programs for malnourished children up to five years of age, mothers who are nursing children, and pregnant women.

    It is estimated that the food currently being provided by the Church will provide supplemental and therapeutic feeding for 13,000 children for three months.

    All food being delivered is processed and packaged for immediate use. It is being distributed at ten separate locations.

    Also being provided are medical equipment, a delivery vehicle, soap products, and 160,000 pounds of clothing.

    The Church is delivering its aid through relief agencies, including Interaid International in northeast Kenya, where hundreds of thousands of Somalian refugees are concentrated; through Save the Children USA in Mozambique and Zimbabwe; and through the National Council of Negro Women (USA) in Zimbabwe.

    Somalian refugees gather to wait for distribution of food from various relief agencies. (Photography courtesy of International Christian Aid.)

    Relief supplies are unloaded in preparation for distribution among the needy.

    A supplementary food program benefits these African children.