Welfare Square
Welfare Square
Schedule
Please contact Welfare Square for specific schedule information.
Tours available 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily.

Bakery: 801-240-7385
Bishop’s Storehouse: 801-240-7320
Cannery: 801-240-7370
Dairy: 801-240-7350
Deseret Industries: 801-240-7202
Employment Resources: 888-818-4484
Transitional Services: 801-240-7340
Physical Address
751 West 700 South Salt Lake City, Utah 84104
View Map
Contact
1-801-240-3001

Welfare Square

Welfare Square is a landmark location for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in its efforts to care for those in need. The square hosts various employment services, food production and storage facilities, distribution centers, and training facilities. The services housed here are provided free of charge to Latter-day Saints and others in the community.

Latter-day Saints believe in following the example of Jesus Christ to feed the hungry, clothe the naked, and lift up the downtrodden. In the 1930s, many people in the Salt Lake City area were struggling as a result of the Great Depression. In 1936, the Church formalized a welfare program to provide for basic needs and give opportunities for employment. Two years later, in 1938, Welfare Square was created.

Welfare Square resides on its own campus and includes a 178-foot grain silo, a milk and cheese processing plant, a cannery, a bakery, a market-style grocery, a clothing collection warehouse, and employment assistance offices. Services on the square are operated by volunteers and employees of the Church.

Welfare Square is located several blocks southwest of Temple Square and downtown Salt Lake City. Although not physically located on Temple Square, it is considered part of the Church’s Temple Square experience, and various aspects are open for public tours.

Key Experiences

Guided tours last about an hour. (Public tours are currently suspended due to COVID)

  • Watch a short film explaining the history of the Church’s welfare program and its expansion over the years.
  • Tour food production facilities in operation.
  • Tour sorting operations for clothing and other goods.
  • Sample foods and beverages that are made for those in need, such as milk, bread, butter, jam, and peanut butter.

Additional Resources