A Church of Volunteers

Our Sunday meetings and various programs are all run by volunteers. And since congregations are organized geographically, we’re truly a local community sharing our talents to help each other come closer to God.

A group of people meeting to discuss volunteer opportunites at church

The value of volunteers

In local congregations of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, people depend on each other to make sure that everyone’s taken care of. People get assignments known as “callings” that allow them to participate in different aspects of our worship. For example, instead of one minister who gives the sermon every week, the speaking responsibility is divided out among members of the congregation. In addition to speaking, other responsibilities include helping out in the different organizations that serve the congregation’s women, men, teens, and children.

On top of that, each congregation is led by a bishop, who is there to make sure everyone’s needs are met. The bishop also serves on a volunteer basis. No callings are permanent, including serving as bishop. Instead, over time, people get new opportunities to contribute in new, rewarding ways. With this emphasis on volunteer service, every participant is a valued member of the congregation. So please, come worship with us! We need your unique perspective and talents.

...
A bishop of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints explains his testimony of the gospel of Jesus Christ
A bishop of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints explains his testimony of the gospel of Jesus Christ

Meet a Bishop of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

From community to congregation

Each of our local congregations is organized by geography. People are encouraged to attend the congregation within boundaries that include their home. This way, each congregation can function as a responsive community of faith where neighbors can stay connected and strengthen each other. In this same spirit of inclusivity, some special congregations are grouped by factors other than geography. For example, there may be congregations specifically for young single adults or for communities that speak a different language. In The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, each local congregation is traditionally called a “ward.” A group of wards make up a stake. Stakes are named as a reference to Isaiah 54:2, where God’s Church is compared to a large tent with strong stakes that stretch far and wide to make room for all of God’s children.

Local congregations, global influence

Each congregation exists to serve the needs of the local community. But wards all over the world are connected to each other by the Church’s worldwide leadership. This helps make sure that each ward has the resources and support they need to take care of the local members, no matter where they worship. 

A church volunteer meets with a couple outside of chapel

Explore All the Ways We Serve Together